Loose Lips, Part II

Sometimes, I just don’t get it.  I’ve gone through compliance training multiple times; so have friends and colleagues.  It’s ubiquitous at public companies and is designed to educate employees, officers and the board about the company’s code of conduct, which, of course, everyone should also read.

Corporate codes of conduct encompass the legal guidelines and standards of ethical behavior expected of employees, officers and the board, and covers topics like workplace discrimination and harassment; corrupt practices; conflicts of interest; protecting confidential information and insider trading.

So, I was flabbergasted on the news that New York Congressman Chris Collins was indicted on insider trading charges.  This has absolutely nothing to do with politics, but everything do with a breach of his fiduciary responsibility to the company, his fellow directors and the company’s shareholders.

Congressman Collins sits on the board of Innate Immunotherapeutics.  This company’s code of conduct outlines its expectations about disclosure and use of information as well as insider trading. Regarding disclosure and use of information, Innate’s code of conduct states confidential information should not be used in a way which creates a personal benefit or benefits another party not entitled to make use of such information.  It further states confidential information should be kept confidential, and to ask if there is any doubt about what information is considered confidential.

Regarding insider trading, Innate’s code of conduct reminds that it’s a criminal offence to trade company shares while in possession of inside information, which is defined as information not yet publicly available but is expected to have a material effect on the company’s stock price.  The code of conduct then says this trading prohibition applies not only to employees, officers and directors but anyone else – including family and friends – who is given access to inside information.

This is pretty standard stuff.  It places no undue burden on, nor has unrealistic expectations of directors, officers or employees.  Further, the expectations outlined helps ensures those who follow it do not violate Rule 10b-5 of the SEC Act of 1934, which prohibits insider trading.

Yet, the Congressman’s loose lips tipped his son about a failed clinical drug trial before the news became public.  While the Congressman did not trade on this information, his son did and tipped his fiancé’s family, who also traded on the information.  As a director, he should have known better and should not have put his own family in such a position.

Some say insider trading is a victimless crime. That trading is essentially an exchange of information, so the very act of buying or selling is putting information (regardless of source) into the market, enhancing market efficiency.  When all trades are accompanied by a simultaneous news flash of who is trading and why, then I can accept that argument.

Insider trading is a breach of a director’s fiduciary responsibility to shareholders to keep confidential information confidential.  It’s a violation of the law, a company’s code of conduct and the trust of the company’s officers, employees and other directors.  In my view, it’s also crime against trust and the sense of fair play I believe necessary for the effective functioning of the financial markets.

Lisa Ciota
President/Founder
Lead-IR Advisors, Inc.

Join NIRI-Chicago at its annual Investor Relations Workshop – September 28, 2018Print

Sources:
Frenkel, J. (2018, August 8). Insider Trading Charges Against Rep. Collins Reminiscent Of Martha Stewart Conviction. Forbes.
Frenkel, J. (2018, August 13). Collins’ Protestations of Innocence Defy Meritorious Insider Trading Laws. Forbes.

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